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Could student loan refinancing save you money?
What are my private student loan options?

How to Refinance Parent PLUS Loans

How to Refinance Parent PLUS Loans

It’s not uncommon for parents to take out Parent PLUS Loans to help pay for their child’s education. When it comes time to repay these loans, refinancing or consolidation may make the most sense. You may be able to lower your interest rate, make your monthly payment more affordable, or transfer responsibility for the loan to your child.

These are all great reasons to refinance. Here are the details you need to know.

Can You Refinance Parent PLUS Loans?

Yes. You have the option of refinancing Parent PLUS Loans with a private lender. While you may consolidate Parent PLUS Loans with a Direct Consolidation Loan, refinancing is the only way to lower your interest rate or transfer a Parent PLUS Loan to the student. This option comes with a variety of pros and cons that you will want to explore before you make a decision.

Best Companies for Parent Student Loan Refinance

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.25% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.74% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.15% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.99% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 8, 12, or 15 years

 

How to Refinance a Parent PLUS Loan

  1. Locate Loan Information

    The first thing you will need to do if you want to refinance is locate all of your relevant loan information. To locate your loan servicer, log in to your student aid account with your FSA ID. There you will be able to view all of your government student loans, including Parent PLUS Loans and any federal student loans you may have for yourself.

    Note: If you have your own student loans as well as Parent PLUS Loans, you may choose to refinance these loans together into one new loan.

    Note: If you have private parent student loans as well as Parent PLUS Loans, you may choose to refinance those loans together into one new loan.

  2. Compare Lenders

    Once you’ve gathered the contact information and balances for your existing loans you will want to compare lenders to find the right fit for you. Compare features such as:

    • Interest rates
    • Interest rate reduction for enrolling in auto-pay
    • Repayment term options
    • Cosigner release
    • Maximum loan amount
    • Minimum credit score
    • Deferment options
    • Fees (if any), such as application or loan origination fees

     

  3. Apply

    Once you’ve chosen a lender it’s time to apply. Most lenders offer an easy online application to get you started. If you are transferring a Parent PLUS Loan to your child, your child will need to apply for the refinance loan.

Should You Refinance Parent PLUS Loans

Whether or not you should refinance Parent PLUS Loans depends on what you want to achieve. If you’re looking to lower your interest rate or transfer the loan to your child, you will only be able to achieve this through a student loan refinance.

When you refinance federal student loans, you will lose any benefits that come with the federal student loan program, such as federal repayment plans, as well as deferment and forbearance. If you are not eligible to take advantage of these programs, student loan refinancing with a private lender may be the right move.

How to Transfer a Parent PLUS Loan to Your Child

In order to transfer a Parent PLUS Loan to your child, your child will need to apply for the loan. This will require them to have a minimum credit score of 660 as well as stable employment.

If your child needs a cosigner to refinance the loans into their name, look for a lender that offers cosigner release. This allows the cosigner to be released from responsibility for the loan after a series of consecutive on-time payments (typically 24 to 48 months), as well as meeting other requirements the lender—make sure to read those terms and conditions!

Your child should compare lenders and follow the application process outlined above.

 

Best Companies for Transferring a PLUS Loan to a Child

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.25% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.74% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.15% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.99% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 8, 12, or 15 years

 

When to Refinance Parent PLUS Loans

The best time to refinance Parent PLUS Loans is when interest rates are low. Current refinance rates are start as low as 1.87%, making it a great time to refinance student loans.

If you’re looking to refinance Parent PLUS Loans into the student’s name, you will want to wait until the student has secured stable employment and has a credit score of at least 660.

Pros and Cons of Refinancing Parent PLUS Loans

As with most things, refinancing Parent PLUS Loans has its pros and cons. Let’s look at the benefits of student loan refinance you will want to consider before taking action.

Pros of Refinancing Parent PLUS Loans

Reduce your number of monthly payments

Refinancing student loans, including Parent PLUS Loans, allows you to roll multiple loans into one new loan, reducing the number of payments you need to make each month. You do not have to have multiple student loans to refinance. You may refinance a singular loan as well.

Transfer loan to child

Refinancing a Parent PLUS Loan is the only way to transfer the loan to your child. If this is your goal you will want to pursue private student loan refinancing.

Lower your interest rate

If your main goal is to lower your interest rate student loan refinancing may be right for you. Refinancing your existing Parent PLUS Loans with a private student loan refinance is the only way to pursue a lower your interest rate. Your lender will determine your interest rate based on your credit.

Lower your monthly payment amount

When you refinance your Parent PLUS Loans, you can select your new repayment term. If you’re looking to lower your monthly payment amount, you may choose to extend your repayment term out longer to make each monthly payment lower.

No origination fees

Many private student loan refinance lenders do not charge origination fees for disbursement of the loan.

Cons of Refinancing Parent PLUS Loans

Now it’s time to look at some of the drawbacks of refinancing Parent PLUS Loans with a private lender. Note that the cons to refinance Parent PLUS Loans are primarily related to taking your loans out of the federal program.

Lose eligibility for federal repayment options

When you refinance student loans with a private lender you will lose eligibility for the federal repayment programs, such as, income-driven repayment.

Lose eligibility for federal deferment and forbearance

Perhaps the most important benefit you need to weigh losing is the generous periods of deferment and forbearance offered with federal student loans. Some private student loan lenders may offer some sort of hardship forbearance, but these periods aren’t as lengthy as those offered by the federal program and are not a feature of all lenders.

Best Companies for Parent Student Loan Refinance

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.25% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.74% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years

Recommendation
Best for Student Loan Refinancing
Interest Rates

Variable as low as: 2.15% APR1

Fixed as low as: 2.99% APR1

Repayment Terms

5, 8, 12, or 15 years

Parent PLUS Loan Consolidation

An alternative to refinancing your parent PLUS loans with a private lender is to consolidate them through the Direct Consolidation Loan program. This is the federal student loan consolidation program, and is only available for federally held loans, meaning if you want to combine federal and private student loans together, you would not be able to do so with a Direct Consolidation Loan. You do not have to include all of your federal student loans in your consolidation loan.

Let’s look at the pros and cons of Direct Consolidation Loans.

Pros of Parent PLUS Loan Consolidation with a Direct Consolidation Loan

Combine multiple student loans into one

If you have several federal student loans with different loan servicers consolidating your loans will simplify your payments by combining multiple loans into one with a singular loan servicer.

Parent PLUS Loan may become eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness

When you consolidate your student loans through the federal program your Parent PLUS loan may be eligible for for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF). You would need to repay the Direct Consolidation Loan under an income-contingent repayment plan and meet all other eligibility criteria for PSLF.

Retain deferment and forbearance

The federal student loan program comes with generous periods of deferment and forbearance to help borrowers who have encountered hardship or inability to pay.

Loans will be discharged if you or your child dies

With the federal student loan program if you or the child you borrowed the loan for pass away, the student loans will be discharged.

Adjust your repayment term

When you consolidate Parent PLUS Loans, you may choose a new repayment term (up to 30 years). This will lower your monthly payments by extending the amount of time you have to repay the loan. You will continue to be charged interest over the life of the loan, meaning if you extend your repayment term, your loan will cost you more over time.

Cons of a Parent PLUS Loan Consolidation with a Direct Consolidation Loan

Cannot get a lower interest rate

When you consolidate Parent PLUS Loans with a Direct Consolidation Loan, your new interest rate with be the weighted average interest rate of your existing loans. Essentially, this means that your interest rate will not really change but will be an average of your existing interest rates, weighted by loan balance. Learn how weighted average interest rate is calculated.

Cannot transfer loans to your child

When you consolidate your loans with a Direct Consolidation loan you have no opportunity to transfer the loan to your child. The loan remains in your name for the life of the loan or until you transfer the loan to your child with a private student loan refinance.

Loss of repayment benefits

If you have been paying your student loans under an income-driven repayment plan, you will lose any credit for payments made toward these programs.

Could student loan refinancing save you money?

 

What are my private student loan options?